Haikasoru

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Trim: 5 1/4 x 8    ISBN: 978-1-4215-4089-4

EVERYONE COMPLAINS ABOUT GIANT MONSTERS—IT’S ABOUT TIME SOMEBODY DID SOMETHING ABOUT THEM.

Synopsis

Japan is beset by natural disasters all the time: typhoons, earthquakes, and...giant monster attacks. A special anti-monster unit called the Meteorological Agency Monsterological Measures Department (MMD) has been formed to deal with natural disasters of high “monster magnitude.” The work is challenging, the public is hostile, and the monsters are hungry, but the MMD crew has science, teamwork... and a legendary secret weapon on their side. Together, they can save Japan, and the universe!

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HIROSHI YAMAMOTO

Hiroshi Yamamoto was born in 1956 in Kyoto. Began his career with game developers Group SNE in 1987 and debuted as a writer and game designer. Gained popularity with juvenile titles such as February at the Edge of Time and the Ghost Hunter series. His first hardcover science fiction release, God Never Keeps Silent became a sensation among SF fans and was nominated for the Japan SF Award. Other novels include Day of Judgment and The Unseen Sorrow of Winter. Aside from his work as a writer, Yamamoto is also active in various literary capacities as editor of classic science fiction anthologies and as president of To-Gakkai, a group of tongue-in-cheek "experts" on the occult.

HIROSHI YAMAMOTO

Photo by
Tatsuya Jinbo

Excerpt

Takebashi, Chiyoda Ward, Tokyo: Japan Meteorological Agency HQ—

A jittery reporter on the flatscreen TV was saying, “The child—no, the kaiju with the appearance of a child—just sat down in the Nagara riverside road and is holding a car, pushing it back and forth, playing with it like a toy. Oh! She’s lifted it up now. Oh, that’s really high. There doesn’t appear to be anyone inside, but . . .”

Kurihama fumed. “Enough of her face! Show us below her neck! Below her neck!”

“Chief,” Toshio said soothingly, “you know they can’t. It’s broadcast TV.”

Yuri grumbled, “Really, this doesn’t give us anything.”

Five hours had passed since the kaiju was first sighted, and all the networks had teams of reporters on-site—but all of them broadcast images with a digital mosaic obscuring the girl’s body below her neck. It was self-censorship, each network independently coming to the same conclusion—an uncensored image might have run afoul of child pornography laws. But even so, it was frustrating for the MMD not to have full knowledge of the kaiju they were dealing with.
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