Haikasoru

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Space Opera. Dark Fantasy. Hard Science.
ALL YOU NEED IS KILL Buy Now!

ALL YOU NEED IS KILL
HIROSHI SAKURAZAKA

Available on the eBook! THE LORD OF THE SANDS OF TIME Buy Now!

THE LORD OF THE SANDS OF TIME
ISSUI OGAWA

Available on the eBook! ZOO Buy Now!

ZOO
OTSUICHI

USURPER OF THE SUN Buy Now!

USURPER OF THE SUN
HOUSUKE NOJIRI

Available on the eBook! BATTLE ROYALE: THE NOVEL Buy Now!

BATTLE ROYALE: THE NOVEL
KOUSHUN TAKAMI

BRAVE STORY Buy Now!

BRAVE STORY
MIYUKI MIYABE

Available on the eBook! THE BOOK OF HEROES Buy Now!

THE BOOK OF HEROES
MIYUKI MIYABE

Available on the eBook! YUKIKAZE Buy Now!

YUKIKAZE
CHŌHEI KAMBAYASHI

Available on the eBook! LOUPS-GAROUS Buy Now!

LOUPS-GAROUS
NATSUHIKO KYOGOKU

Available on the eBook! SLUM ONLINE Buy Now!

SLUM ONLINE
HIROSHI SAKURAZAKA

Available on the eBook! THE NEXT CONTINENT Buy Now!

THE NEXT CONTINENT
ISSUI OGAWA

Available on the eBook! THE STORIES OF IBIS Buy Now!

THE STORIES OF IBIS
HIROSHI YAMAMOTO

Available on the eBook! HARMONY Buy Now!

HARMONY
PROJECT ITOH

Available on the eBook! ROCKET GIRLS Buy Now!

ROCKET GIRLS
HOUSUKE NOJIRI

Available on the eBook! THE OUROBOROS WAVE Buy Now!

THE OUROBOROS WAVE
JYOUJI HAYASHI

Available on the eBook! SUMMER, FIREWORKS, AND MY CORPSE Buy Now!

SUMMER, FIREWORKS, AND MY CORPSE
OTSUICHI

DRAGON SWORD AND WIND CHILD Buy Now!

DRAGON SWORD AND WIND CHILD
NORIKO OGIWARA

Available on the eBook! MARDOCK SCRAMBLE Buy Now!

MARDOCK SCRAMBLE
TOW UBUKATA

Available on the eBook! ROCKET GIRLS: THE LAST PLANET Buy Now!

ROCKET GIRLS: THE LAST PLANET
HOUSUKE NOJIRI

Available on the eBook! MIRROR SWORD AND SHADOW PRINCE Buy Now!

MIRROR SWORD AND SHADOW PRINCE
NORIKO OGIWARA

Available on the eBook! GOOD LUCK YUKIKAZE Buy Now!

GOOD LUCK YUKIKAZE
CHŌHEI KAMBAYASHI

Available on the eBook! ICO: CASTLE IN THE MIST Buy Now!

ICO: CASTLE IN THE MIST
MIYUKI MIYABE

Available on the eBook! THE CAGE OF ZEUS Buy Now!

THE CAGE OF ZEUS
SAYURI UEDA

Available on the eBook! TEN BILLION DAYS AND ONE HUNDRED BILLION NIGHTS Buy Now!

TEN BILLION DAYS AND ONE HUNDRED BILLION NIGHTS
RYU MITSUSE

Available on the eBook! MM9 Buy Now!

MM9
HIROSHI YAMAMOTO

Available on the eBook! THE NAVIDAD INCIDENT: THE DOWNFALL OF MATÍAS GUILI Buy Now!

THE NAVIDAD INCIDENT: THE DOWNFALL OF MATÍAS GUILI
NATSUKI IKEZAWA

Available on the eBook! THE FUTURE IS JAPANESE Buy Now!

THE FUTURE IS JAPANESE
HAIKASORU

Available on the eBook! METAL GEAR SOLID: GUNS OF THE PATRIOTS Buy Now!

METAL GEAR SOLID: GUNS OF THE PATRIOTS
PROJECT ITOH

Available on the eBook! GENOCIDAL ORGAN Buy Now!

GENOCIDAL ORGAN
PROJECT ITOH

Available on the eBook! Belka, Why Don’t You Bark? Buy Now!

BELKA, WHY DON'T YOU BARK?
HIDEO FURUKAWA

Available on the eBook! VIRUS Buy Now!

VIRUS
SAKYO KOMATSU

Available on the eBook! SELF-REFERENCE ENGINE Buy Now!

SELF-REFERENCE ENGINE
TOH ENJOE

Available on the eBook! Noble V: Greylancer Buy Now!

NOBLE V: GREYLANCER
HIDEYUKI KIKUCHI

Available on the eBook! THE MELANCHOLY OF MECHAGIRL Buy Now!

THE MELANCHOLY OF MECHAGIRL
CATHERYNNE M. VALENTE

Available on the eBook! Apparitions Buy Now!

APPARITIONS
MIYUKI MIYABE

Available on the eBook! The Battle Royale Slam Book Buy Now!

THE BATTLE ROYALE SLAM BOOK
HAIKASORU

Available on the eBook! BATTLE ROYALE REMASTERED Buy Now!

BATTLE ROYALE REMASTERED
KOUSHUN TAKAMI

Edge Of Tomorrow Buy Now!

EDGE OF TOMORROW
HIROSHI SAKURAZAKA

All You Need Is Kill Graphic Novel Buy Now!

ALL YOU NEED IS KILL GRAPHIC NOVEL
HIROSHI SAKURAZAKA
NICK MAMATAS
LEE FERGUSON

Available on the eBook! Phantasm Japan Buy Now!

PHANTASM JAPAN
HAIKASORU

Available on the eBook! Asura Girl Buy Now!

ASURA GIRL
OTARO MAIJO

Available on the eBook! Dendera Buy Now!

DENDERA
YUYA SATO

Available on the eBook! Red Girls Buy Now!

RED GIRLS
KAZUKI SAKURABA

Available on the eBook! Gene Mapper Buy Now!

GENE MAPPER
TAIYO FUJII

Available on the eBook! GOTH Buy Now!

GOTH
OTSUICHI

Available on the eBook! HANZAI JAPAN Buy Now!

HANZAI JAPAN
HAIKASORU

Available on the eBook! Legend of the Galactic Heroes, Volume 1: Dawn Buy Now!

LEGEND OF THE GALACTIC HEROES, VOLUME 1: DAWN
YOSHIKI TANAKA

Available on the eBook!
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HANZAI JAPAN giveaway contest winners!

Thanks for the great turnout and intriguing essay-comments this time around. Without further ado, here are the four winners of our Hanzai Japan giveaway contest! Though we must say that we are shocked and saddened that nobody mentioned Rebus.

Anyway… First up is Matthew! Though naming S. J. Rozan’s Lydia Chin/Bill Smith wouldn’t have been cheating (they’re in the book!), we’re big fans of Jim Chee as well.

Second is Carrie Morita for writing a poem! We are suckers for poems! Naomi Hirahara seems to inspire them!

Third up is the mysterious “n”, who mentioned comic book antihero Spider Jerusalem. (We’re also huge fans of Warren Ellis’s two prose crime novels, btw.) We’re big believers in “broad church” crime fiction, so liked the out there suggestion.

And finally, if only in order to encourage Alex to write the story, we select this entry about the notional detective seeking out the murder of Alexander III. Thanks for playing everyone, and remember to pick up a copy of Hanzai Japan next week! Catch me on gmail.com 

It’s the HANZAI JAPAN giveaway contest!

Next week we launch Hanzai Japan, our third anthology, which is already getting some good pre-release buzz. And that means this week we launch our giveaway contest!

Hanzai means crime, which is the slogan of the book. It features fiction running the gamut of crime from vampiric police procedurals to supernatural prisons to good ol’ fashioned murder sprees. Contributors include New York Times best-seller Carrie Vaughn, All You Need Is KILL/Edge of Tomorrow‘s Hiroshi Sakurazaka, Catwoman’s Genevieve Valentine, mystery genre stalwarts S. J. Rozan and Naomi Hirahara, cross-genre author Jeff Somers, and many more.

The contest this time around is a simple one. In the comments to this post, write a brief essay telling us who your favorite fictional sleuth who is not Sherlock Holmes is. It can be an amateur sleuth, or a supernatural detective; a costumed crime-fighter or a hard-boiled anti-hero. As usual, you can post in English, Spanish, Japanese, German, Chinese, or Greek, and around noon on Friday we’ll pick our four favorite responses four lucky winners will receive a copy of Hanzai Japan! Don’t be shy; we ship worldwide.

Points for cleverness! We’ll look at poems, even Begin!

Terry Gallagher wins the The Japan-United States Friendship Commission Prize!

So thrilled that Terry Gallagher’s translation of Toh EnJoe’s Self-Reference ENGINE won the Japan-United States Friendship Commission Prize!

Press release below!

Recipients of Japan-United States Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Japanese Literature Announced

New York, New York, October 1st, 2015 — The jury for the Japan-United States Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Japanese Literature met on September 25th, 2015, in New York City and decided on the winners of this year’s competition.

The Prizes for the calendar year 2015-2016 will be awarded to the following translators, listed in alphabetical order by last name:

Steven D. Carter for THE COLUMBIA ANTHOLOGY OF JAPANESE ESSAYS
(Columbia University Press, 2014)

Terry Gallagher for his translation of Toh Enjoe’s SELF-REFERENCE ENGINE
(VIZ Media, 2013)

Stephen D. Miller and Patrick Donnelly for their waka translation in THE WIND
FROM VULTURE PEAK (Cornell East Asia Series, 2013)

An awards ceremony will be held at Columbia University in New York City on Friday December 11th, 2015. The Japan-United States Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Japanese Literature was established in 1979, and the award has been administered by the Donald Keene Center of Japanese Culture at Columbia University since the Center was founded in 1986. The Prize is awarded annually to outstanding works of translation into English from the Japanese language.

About the Japan United States Friendship Commission:

The Japan United States Friendship Commission (JUSFC) was established as an independent agency by the US Congress in 1975 (P.L. 94-118). The Commission administers a US government trust fund that originated in connection with the return to the Japanese government of certain US facilities in Okinawa and for postwar American assistance to Japan. Income from the fund is available for the promotion of scholarly, cultural and public affairs activities between the two countries.

About the Donald Keene Center of Japanese Culture:
Founded in 1986 at Columbia University, the Donald Keene Center of Japanese Culture is named in honor of Professor Donald Keene, internationally renowned scholar, Columbia University teacher, and interpreter of Japanese literature and culture to the West. The Center is dedicated to advancing the understanding of Japan and its culture in the United States through university instruction, research, and public education. In addition, the Center seeks to encourage study of the interrelationships among the cultures of Japan, other Asian countries, Europe, and the United States. The DKC is the central institution supporting the study of Japanese culture, literature, art, and history at Columbia University, and frequently co-sponsors events with the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, the Center for
Korean Research, and other Columbia centers and institutes.

Contact:
Yoshiko Niiya, Program Coordinator
Donald Keene Center of Japanese Culture
212-854-5036
http://www.keenecenter.org

HANZAI JAPAN

From “Hanami,” a Lydia Chin/Bill Smith short story by S. J. Rozan

Every time I come to Washington it rains.

I don’t know why this should be, but my father used to tell my brothers and me that there’s no point in denying reality, even reality that’s ridiculous. Rain fell insistently, tracing diagonal lines across the windows, as the Acela train Bill Smith and I were riding pulled into Union Station.

“It’s still beautiful,” Bill said. “Soggy, but at least down here it’s spring.”

“You don’t have to try to make me feel better. I don’t believe I have some paranormal effect on the weather and it rains because I’m coming. I just think I unconsciously but cleverly time my trips here to make sure to coincide with the rain.”

“Not a paranormal effect on the weather, just a preternatural relationship with it? Sure, why not?”

We swung our overnight bags down and beat it to the subway. In Washington they call it the Metro and it runs on rubber wheels, and in the place we came out, Dupont Circle, it had a huge sci-fi escalator to the street. “You think we’ll be on Mars when we get to the top?” I asked as the gray sky in the round opening came closer.

“I think we’re already on Mars if we’ve really taken this case.”

“We can’t not take it. I told you, Moriko’s one of my oldest friends. We were super close in high school until her family moved here her senior year. I used to date her big brother. Maybe you can’t take it. But I have to.”

“I can’t take what, the fact that you used to date her older brother? Oh, you mean the case. What kind of person would leave his partner on her own with a client who thinks she’s a fox? Besides, from what you say she actually is a fox, though not the kind she thinks she is.”

“Hands off. That’s the whole problem here—a man after her who she doesn’t want.”

“What makes you think she wouldn’t want me?”

“Let me count the ways.”

I lofted my umbrella, Bill sunk his head in his raincoat collar, and we splashed the two blocks to the row house where Moriko Ikeda lived in an apartment on the parlor floor.

As I told Bill, Moriko and I have been close since high school. We went to Townsend Harris in Flushing, Queens, which is stuffed full of brainy Asian kids but, as my brother Tim never lets me forget, isn’t Stuyvesant. My four brothers and I all went to high schools you had to test into, but different ones. Tim was already at Stuyvesant when my tests came up; I didn’t even fill out the application. Why? The different-schools thing hadn’t applied to elementary school. I was the youngest—and a girl—and I followed my brothers all the way through Sun Yat-Sen in Chinatown. I couldn’t wait to get to a school where, when anyone asked if I was related to such-and-such a kid named “Chin,” I could say I wasn’t, not just wish I wasn’t.

Moriko and I hit it off from the beginning, even though the Chinese and Japanese kids mostly eyed each other with suspicion (and the Koreans eyed both of us that way, and the black kids eyed the Latino kids that way, and the white kids were too stunned by finding themselves in the minority to do anything but huddle together for warmth). With me and Moriko, maybe it was an opposites-attracting kind of thing. I was a short, straightforward, practical jock; she was tall, elegant, sweet, and spacey.

Never this spacey, though. She’d called yesterday to ask me to come to Washington as a last-ditch attempt to solve her problem, which was: a man had stolen her kitsunebi, and since she’d die without it, she had to do what he wanted so he’d give it back. Kitsunebi is the soul of a kitsune, a fox spirit, and in this case what the man wanted was for Moriko to marry him.

Moriko buzzed us in within seconds of my pressing her doorbell. We’d stepped into the building’s small entry hall and I was folding my umbrella for stashing when she opened the glass-paneled inner door. Her eyes lit up when she saw me, and I’m sure mine did when I saw her. Bill’s eyes I didn’t look at because I didn’t want to know.

You have to understand: Moriko is gorgeous. She’s not actually super tall, maybe five-ten, but she’s so slender that she gives a long-limbed, languid impression. She seems not to walk so much as flow, and the shoulder-length hair framing her narrow, high-cheekboned face is as black and glossy as her skin is pale.

Paler than usual, today. She led us into her apartment through a pair of large double doors, closed them behind her, and hugged me. “Thank you for coming, both of you. Though I’m feeling guilty about calling you. I don’t know what you can possibly do. Oh, I’m sorry, that’s so rude of me.” She extended her hand to Bill. “Moriko Ikeda.”

“Bill Smith. Don’t be sorry and don’t feel guilty. I haven’t been to Washington in awhile. Happy to come down.”

“I wish I could have provided better weather.”

“Don’t worry about it, that’s Lydia’s fault.”

Moriko raised her delicate eyebrows but I didn’t explain. After a moment she said, “I have tea. I’ll bring it right in.”

While Moriko went to get the tea, Bill whispered to me, “Do kitsune control the weather?”

“No. That was human small talk.”

I’m always surprised when I find myself explaining something to Bill. As he’s pointed out more than once, I’m the Asian person in our relationship. But he, rumpled, antisocial, and blue-collar as he appears—though not today; today he wore a sharp navy suit with a white shirt and blue-and-silver tie—is the one with the deep background in art, music, and all kinds of culture, including Asian culture. So long before Moriko hired us, he’d heard of kitsune; but apparently he wasn’t familiar with their fine points.

I was, because I’d looked them up.

For example, they’re usually called “fox spirits,” but that makes them sound like ghosts and they’re not ghosts. They’re regular foxes who’ve reached a great age and attained wisdom and magical powers. Like shapeshifting. Into old men, young girls, and beautiful women.

For another example, they carry their souls, their kitsunebi, outside their bodies in glowing globes of fire. In fox form, they hold the globes on their tails. When they’re humans, where to keep the globes—the kitsunebi-dama—becomes problematic. And it seemed that Blake Adderly, up-and-coming young hotshot D.C. power broker, had, in the course of dating Moriko, discovered and walked off with hers.




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