Haikasoru

 

Space Opera. Dark Fantasy. Hard Science.
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Hugo awards [Archive]

The Future is AWARDS AWARDS AWARDS!!!!

We’ve gotten some good news recently! Of course, as you may remember, “Mono No Aware” by Ken Liu from The Future Is Japanese is a Hugo Award nominee.


Like a box of Crackerjack box, there are prizes inside! Literary prizes!

But we have more award news! We were especially thrilled last week when Project Itoh’s novella “The Indifference Engine” was nominated for the Shirley Jackson Award—this being the first time one of the Japanese originals in the book was lauded with a nomination.

Several of our stories (all from English-language authors) were on the Locus Magazine recommended reading list and today we are pleased to announce that both Ken Liu’s story and the anthology itself are Locus Award finalists!

So that’s a Hugo, two Loci, and a Shirley Jackson. What are you waiting for? The future awaits! Buy the book!

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Q/A With Ken Liu (and the return of Intern Kathleen)

We are all very excited that prolific author Ken Liu received a prestigious Hugo Award nomination for his short story “Mono No Aware” in The Future Is Japanese. We decided to ask him a few questions about the story and life as an award-nominated author!

Q. Congrats: what was the genesis of the story “Mono No Aware”? A. This story began as an experiment. Claims are often made about the universalism of certain narrative conventions: the hero must be active; there must be conflict; the individual must strive and overcome obstacles and define the self against the larger society. I get annoyed with these kinds of “rules” because they are not universal at all. Storytelling conventions in non-Western traditions often are very different.

In particular, I was intrigued by works like Yokohama Kaidashi Kikō that try to pursue an aesthetic primarily oriented towards creating in the reader an empathy towards the inevitable passing of all things: a sentiment known as mono no aware in Japanese.

So I wanted to write a story in which that was the dominant ideal, and to redefine heroism along those lines.

Q. You’re a prolific writer of short stories. What attracts you to the form? A. The main reason is one of time. With two young children, it’s hard for me to sustain the prolonged period of focus and attention necessary to produce a novel. But short stories allow me to work through an idea quickly and see immediate results, which encourages me to write more.

Q. Speaking of your rate of production, were you surprised that this story, out of all you published in 2012, was nominated for the Hugo? Why do you think it appeals to Worldcon members and supporting members specifically? A. I am indeed surprised. However, I’m generally not very good at predicting how well my stories will resonate with readers, so I’m not surprised by my surprise, if that makes sense. Right now, I’m just grateful that enough voters liked this story to nominate it, which is a great honor.

Q. What research did you do on Japan and Japanese cultural mores for the story? A. Well, I did the usual: lots of reading, lots of watching, and lots of talking to people who know something about Japan. My wife majored in Japanese and lived and worked for years in Japan, so she was an invaluable source as well.

However, and this is a point I want to emphasize, I do not presume in any way, shape, or form, to have “gotten” the Japanese concepts right. No matter how much research is done, an outsider’s perspective will never have the same quality as an insider’s. Reading about a culture is not the same as growing up in a culture.

To be sure that I’m respectful to the material, I employed a narrative trick: the story is told from the perspective of a Japanese child whose experience of his homeland ended at the age of eight. His knowledge of Japan is thus a combination of hazy memories, what outsiders have told him about home, and his own fierce desire to protect the memories of the people he loved. It is necessarily an idealized, filtered, distorted, incomplete image. He is constructing a Japan in his mind.

The choice thus provides the reader with an explanation for the gaps and errors in his construction. And the story, in a sense, is really an immigration story. Every immigrant constructs an image of home that may not be very close to the original.

Q. Nostalgia is a recurring motif in your work. What drives you to integrate nostalgia into science fiction settings? A. Some of the science fiction I’ve read evinces a deliberate contempt for the past, as if history doesn’t matter, as if we have to only decide to look forward and the task is done. But our lots are inextricably linked to the fates of those who came before us, and their choices determined the choices available to us. I wanted to bring some empathy with the past into the science fiction I write, to acknowledge the importance of memory and continuity with the past.

Q. If you win the Hugo this year, what will you do with the tin rocket trophy? A. Probably put it on a very high shelf so that my daughters don’t hurt themselves by playing with it—that tip is sharp.

Q. When are you going to publish a novel anyway? A. Working on it… working on it…

The hope is to be done with my first novel later this summer. Wish me luck!

Good luck, Ken!

Also, as mentioned the other day, the ebook editions of The Future is Japanese is on sale for a mere $3.99 for the month of April. And that’s not all! As it turns out, ebooks are made out of electrons, and can be kept in slim little boxes. I mean, look at poor Intern Kathleen struggling under the weight of the mighty paperback:


So…many…stories…all excellent…must…read

And now here she is with her ebook reader!

Heavy reading is totally lightweight with this ebook reader!

So remember, not only does The Future is Japanese contain Ken’s award nominated story as well as work by Toj EnJoe, Bruce Sterling, Catherynne Valente, and Hideyuki Kikuchi, for the month of April the ebook version will be as light on your pocketbook as it is on your back!
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“Mono No Aware” by Ken Liu gets a Hugo nomination!

We are thrilled to report this morning that “Mono No Aware” by Ken Liu, the lead story in our anthology The Future Is Japanese has been nominated for the most prestigious award in science fiction, The Hugo Award.

The Hugo Award is voted on by the fans, specifically the fans who are members of the annual World Science Fiction Convention—and of course virtually everyone in SF publishing also attends the convention and nominates and votes each year. So it’s really an honor, and it is our second Hugo nomination. Two years ago editor Nick Mamatas was nominated for Best Editor, Long Form.

It’s also very nice to see that our book has gained some attention—these days thanks to ease of reading online, stories that are available for free on the Web often have an advantage, if only because they’re easier for the fans to read and consider and pass around. Anthology stories often do less well come award season, so clearly very positive word of mouth carried the day with “Mono No Aware.”

We also feature the Upside-Down Japanese Girl Seal of Approval

Naturally, there’s also the issue that Ken himself is a very prolific writer of short stories, so people do seek his work out, and people like voting for him. So that it was our Ken Liu story and not the other dozen or so he published this year that was so honored is a special thrill.

To celebrate, we have lowered the price of the ebook edition to $3.99 for the rest of the month. Whether you like Kindle or Apple, SONY or NOOK, go check out The Future Is Japanese, cheap!

Aaand, if you’re so moved by your reading, remember that you can vote for Ken’s story, and stories by Bruce Sterling, Rachel Swirsky, David Moles, and Catherynne M. Valente, or the anthology itself (the Hugos lack an Anthology category) for the almost-as-prestigious LOCUS Awards until April 15th. So get to reading! We like prizes!

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Haikasoru and the Hugos

As many of you have heard by now, I have been nominated for the Hugo Award in the category of Best Editor, Long Fiction, along with many other great editors:

Best Editor, Long Form
Lou Anders
Ginjer Buchanan
Moshe Feder
Liz Gorinsky
Nick Mamatas
Beth Meacham
Juliet Ulman

The Hugo is the most prestigious award in science fiction, and it is voted on by the fans, specifically the fans who attend (or support) the World Science Fiction Convention, aka Worldcon. Here are some details. Fans both nominate and vote on the nominees.

Best Editor, Long Form is a relatively new category in the Hugos—for years there was a single editor category, but it was generally dominated by anthologists and the editors of short fiction magazines. After all, their names were on the mastheads, covers, and under the editorial notes or introductions to their magazines and books. Who knows who edits books? Indeed, one reason why my name appeared on the ballot is that I am closely identified with Haikasoru. Someone may have read two or three of our titles, enjoyed them, and thus put me on their nominating ballot. That same fan may have read and loved a dozen books published by Tor or Ace, and had no idea who edited them. Thus, BELF is a fairly small category—it takes only a couple of dozen votes to get on the ballot. For the more popular categories, like Best Novel or Best Dramatic Presentation (itself split into long and short, or basically feature films and TV shows/shorts) may need over one hundred votes just to get on the ballot.

It can be difficult not to make a big deal of the Hugos, since the awards are very important to the field-and I am thrilled to be a nominee for Haikasoru—but I did want to demystify the proceedings a bit. It would be great if more publishers put the name of the editor of the book somewhere on the credits/copyright page to make this category more open to the casual fans. Right now, only the people who really follow the science fiction horse race very closely vote in that category. It’s like being nominated for an Oscar in the Best Sound Editing or whatnot.

The Hugos are having some influence already. James Nicoll, himself a two-time Hugo nominee for Best Fan Writer, has been talking about Haikasoru for months and is now reviewing or having reviewed every Haikasoru title on his blog—follow his schedule here. He also talks about other things, of course, such as books he’s read, Canadian politics, and his forty-nine cats. It’s interesting stuff.

Also interesting is the fanzine Drink Tank (a Hugo nominee in Best Fanzine!) by Chris Garcia (a Best Fan Writer nominee!), especially the recent issue handicapping the Hugos (opens PDF). What he had to say about the Best Editor, Long Form category was especially interesting, I think. Here’s the page, reproduced with permission:

Chanting my name, you say? Well, that could fun. Not very likely though.

And anyway, I don’t need to win a Hugo. My co-worker Urian already created this for me, and it hangs proudly over my desk:

But I’ll see you all in Reno!

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