Haikasoru

viz.com

Space Opera. Dark Fantasy. Hard Science.
What is Haikasoru?
Our Books

locus magazine [Archive]

So many HANZAI JAPAN reviews…

Hanzai Japan was published just over a month ago, and boy, have the reviews been pouring in! We thought we’d share a few. First up was the October 2015 issue of Locus Magazine. The review by Karen Burnham is not online, but did conclude like this: All of which is to say that Haikasoru has put out another winner of an anthology, joining The Future is Japanese (2012) and Phantasm Japan (2014) in presenting a diverse array of voices, both Western stars (Valentine, Evenson) and Japanese authors in translation, to show just how appealing and intertwined the fiction coming out of Japan can be for the Western genre audience. Between the dark, the fantastic, the science fictional, the surreal, and the funny – there is no monolithic Japan here, just writers writing about crime, or things that might be crimes, or things that happen as the result of crimes (no matter how far stretched that definition may be) in all the different voices available to them.

Then we had a nice long 4.5 star review from SFSignal.com, which read, in part: So if this doesn’t sound like a trippy, fun, and highly entertaining collection to you, then I’m not 100% sure that you’re human. I mean, maybe you’re a space lizard in a human suit. With terrible taste. If my review of Hanzai Japan did pique your interest, though, then go grab a copy.

Albedo1 agreed! Despite its few flaws, Hanzai Japan was a gripping read throughout. If you feel that itch that only quality crime fiction can scratch, then this anthology is for you.

So did CrowsnBones! There are hackers, amateur sleuths, demonic tattoos, fox spirits, Yakuza bosses and a special guest turn by Godzilla, making this a strong contender for the collection of the year. Spinetingler Magazine did one of its famous story-by-story reviews, with a different author handling each piece.

Too many to link to but here are all the posts so far!

Dirge Magazine Loved it: It’s this spirited, loving, bloody rebellion against the genre rulebook that makes these stories tick, that brings them together. Winding through points of view from an ex-pat young woman exploring the quiet deaths of a broken-down theme park, to two American fuckboys getting wasted and in serious trouble in New York’s Little Tokyo, to a group of Yakuza bank robbers watching a PowerPoint on how best to utilise Godzilla in their latest heist, Hanzai Japan shows both Japan and the West through broken lenses, a playful perversion of how we see ourselves and the other.

Download the latest show box app version for your android and iPhone from the cinemabox app site today. enjoy the videos, Tv shows for free

For the manga and anime crowds, Otaku USA checked in, saying in part: All the stories are solid and build their own world, and the range of voices gives you everything from atmospheric horror to the creepily fantastic to stories dripping with dark humor and a wink at the readers. Hanzai Japan is definitely different from a lot of what is on the market and it’s a fun ride all the way through. Let’s hope to see more of these anthologies coming from VIZ Media!

And just today, from Deadend Follies: t is that kind of book that goes into so many directions and does it with such discipline (at the image of the Japanese people) that it is bound to have a story that’ll catch your imagination. HANZAI JAPAN brought me back to the early 2000s, back when I was binge watching/reading everything Japanese I could get my hands on. Everything great about Japanese pop culture is in this anthology (or almost). Convinced that we have created the greatest holiday present of all time for the reader in your life (even if the only reader is you!)? We hope so. Get shoppin’.

anabolic steroids
deca e associati
genacol
borstspier

It’s the HANZAI JAPAN giveaway contest!

Next week we launch Hanzai Japan, our third anthology, which is already getting some good pre-release buzz. And that means this week we launch our giveaway contest!

Hanzai means crime, which is the slogan of the book. It features fiction running the gamut of crime from vampiric police procedurals to supernatural prisons to good ol’ fashioned murder sprees. Contributors include New York Times best-seller Carrie Vaughn, All You Need Is KILL/Edge of Tomorrow‘s Hiroshi Sakurazaka, Catwoman’s Genevieve Valentine, mystery genre stalwarts S. J. Rozan and Naomi Hirahara, cross-genre author Jeff Somers, and many more.
hotstar app
The contest this time around is a simple one. In the comments to this post, write a brief essay telling us who your favorite fictional sleuth who is not Sherlock Holmes is. It can be an amateur sleuth, or a supernatural detective; a costumed crime-fighter or a hard-boiled anti-hero. As usual, you can post in English, Spanish, Japanese, German, Chinese, or Greek, and around noon on Friday we’ll pick our four favorite responses four lucky winners will receive a copy of Hanzai Japan! Don’t be shy; we ship worldwide.

Points for cleverness! We’ll look at poems, even Begin!

montre pour courir
testosterone naturale
atlanta insurance

“Mono No Aware” by Ken Liu gets a Hugo nomination!

We are thrilled to report this morning that “Mono No Aware” by Ken Liu, the lead story in our anthology The Future Is Japanese has been nominated for the most prestigious award in science fiction, The Hugo Award.

The Hugo Award is voted on by the fans, specifically the fans who are members of the annual World Science Fiction Convention—and of course virtually everyone in SF publishing also attends the convention and nominates and votes each year. So it’s really an honor, and it is our second Hugo nomination. Two years ago editor Nick Mamatas was nominated for Best Editor, Long Form.

It’s also very nice to see that our book has gained some attention—these days thanks to ease of reading online, stories that are available for free on the Web often have an advantage, if only because they’re easier for the fans to read and consider and pass around. Anthology stories often do less well come award season, so clearly very positive word of mouth carried the day with “Mono No Aware.”


We also feature the Upside-Down Japanese Girl Seal of Approval

Naturally, there’s also the issue that Ken himself is a very prolific writer of short stories, so people do seek his work out, and people like voting for him. So that it was our Ken Liu story and not the other dozen or so he published this year that was so honored is a special thrill.

To celebrate, we have lowered the price of the ebook edition to $3.99 for the rest of the month. Whether you like Kindle or Apple, SONY or NOOK, go check out The Future Is Japanese, cheap!

Aaand, if you’re so moved by your reading, remember that you can vote for Ken’s story, and stories by Bruce Sterling, Rachel Swirsky, David Moles, and Catherynne M. Valente, or the anthology itself (the Hugos lack an Anthology category) for the almost-as-prestigious LOCUS Awards until April 15th. So get to reading! We like prizes!

ny blogg
club energie orleans tarif

THE FUTURE IS JAPANESE cleans up on the Locus Recommended Reading List!

The latest issue of Locus Magazine is out and it includes their annual recommended reading list. And we’re all over it!

The Future Is Japanese is listed in the category of Original Anthologies, and five of our stories also appear on the list:

Novelette (basically stories between 7500 and 15,000 words or thereabouts):
‘‘Goddess of Mercy’’, Bruce Sterling (The Future Is Japanese)
‘‘The Sea of Trees’’, Rachel Swirsky (The Future Is Japanese)

Short Story (under 7500 words):
‘‘Mono No Aware’’, Ken Liu (The Future Is Japanese)
‘‘Chitai Heiki Koronbin’’, David Moles (The Future Is Japanese)
‘‘One Breath, One Stroke’’, Catherynne M. Valente (The Future Is Japanese)

In the current issue of Locus itself, there is some great discussion of the book by various critics. In addition to praising the stories on the list, Karen Burnham had this to say: I particularly enjoyed the stories by Ken Liu and Rachel Swirsky (both of whom continue to produce fantastic stories in a wide variety of venues), but the one that surprised me the most was ‘‘Autogenic Dreaming: Interview with the Columns of Clouds’’ by TOBI Hirotaka. I had no idea where that story was going, and in the end it was very thoughtful. Several other reviewers also mentioned our book in their recaps!

The recommended reading list will soon become a survey, and if you liked our book and the stories therein we hope you’ll vote for us! We’ll update you when it’s time, and do follow us on Twitter and Facebook if you like!

Astralean (Clenbuterol)
functional training


Entries (RSS) and Comments (RSS)

HOME | ABOUT VIZ MEDIA | ADVERTISE | TERMS | PRIVACY POLICY

© 2009 VIZ Media, LLC